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Indian Journal of Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology


A study to evaluate the cause of blindness/ low vision among certified visually disabled individuals in Mandya district of Karnataka


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Author Details: Srinivas Siddegowda, Pradeep Addagadde Venkataramana, Manjula Thambuswamy Ramamurthy, Prathibha Shiv

Volume : 2

Issue : 3

Online ISSN : 2395-1451

Print ISSN : 2395-1443

Article First Page : 238

Article End Page : 241


Abstract

Aim: To identify the demographic characteristics, degree and cause of visual disability among certified visually disabled individuals in Mandya district, Karnataka, India in patients attending Ophthalmology OPD.
Materials and Methods: Retrospective record based observational study was carried out in teaching Hospital of Mandya district. Data was collected from visual disability certificates of patients who attended our OPD during the period May 2013 to May 2016. The cause of the visual loss was ascertained. Information from the history, clinical examination and investigations was compiled.
Results: In our study, a total of 152 patients were enrolled out of 170 cases. Children and young adults up to age of 30 years constituted around (48, 31.57%) of cases. Among certified visually disabled individuals there were more males (105, 69.08%) compared to females (47, 30.92%). Amount of visual disability percentage of 100%, 75% and 40% was seen in 102(67.10%), 36(23.68%) and 14(9.21%) people respectively. Congenital ocular malformations (32, 21.05%), Retinitis pigmentosa (27, 17.76%) and Optic atrophy (21, 13.81%) were responsible for more than 50% of the cases.
Conclusion: Children and young adults constitute around one third of disabled individuals. Men are more common beneficiaries when compared to women showing gender bias. Congenital ocular malformation and Retinitis pigmentosa were the most common causes of certified visual disability.

Keywords:
Certification, Congenital Ocular malformation, Retinitis pigmentosa, Visually disabled, Optic atrophy