Contact No: +91-8826373757 | +91-8826859373 | 011-25052216
Email: rakesh.its@gmail.com | editor@innovativepublication.com

Indian Journal of Microbiology Research


Antibiotic resistance pattern of streptococcus pyogenes isolated from clinical samples with special reference to quinolone resistance


Full Text PDF Share on Facebook Share on Twitter


Author Details: Thipperudraswamy. T, Halesh. L.H, Sajjanar.S. Vijetha, Premalatha D.E

Volume : 4

Issue : 1

Online ISSN : 2394-5478

Print ISSN : 2394-546X

Article First Page : 104

Article End Page : 109


Abstract

Background & Objectives: Streptococcus pyogenes producing quinolone resistance are an increasing cause of concern in the hospitals as they produce a therapeutic dilemma for the treating physician. The present study was undertaken to know the prevalence of quinolone resistant streptococcus pyogenes from clinical isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern.
Methods: A total of 28 streptococcus pyogenes were recovered from various clinical specimens. All the samples were processed for routine bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test as per standard protocol (CLSI, Koeneman’s Text Book).
Results: Of 28 streptococcus pyogenes isolates 8(34.78%) were showing Quinolone resistance. In this study, we investigated antimicrobial activity of 20 widely used antibiotics against S. pyogenesisolates. Tetracycline (53.57%), Ampicilin (32.14%), Erythromycin (32.14%) Cotrimoxazole (39.28%), Levofloxacin (28.57%) and Ciprofloxacin (28.57%) were resistant. Cephalosporins like Ceftazidime (21.42%), Cefotaxime (21.42%) and Azithromycin (21.42%) were less resistant. Cefepime (10.71%), Linezolid (7.14%) and Vancomycin (3.57%) were least resistant. All the isolates were sensitive to Meropenem. Majority of Quinolone resistance isolates were resistant to tetracycline.
Conclusion: Of 28 streptococcus pyogenes isolates 8(34.78%) were showing Quinolone resistance. Cefepime (10.71%), Linezolid (7.14%) and Vancomycin (3.57%) were least resistant. All the isolates were sensitive to Meropenem.

Keywords: Streptococcus Pyogenes. Quinolone resistance, GAS Infection, Therapeutic options