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Journal of Dental Specialities


Bond strength assessment of metal brackets bonded to porcelain fused to metal surface using different surface conditioning method


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Author Details: Vaishnav PD, Philip P, Shetty S, Mogra S, Batra P, Dhillon M

Volume : 3

Issue : 1

Online ISSN : 2393-9834

Print ISSN : 2320-7302

Article First Page : 48

Article End Page : 53


Abstract

Introduction: Bonding of orthodontic brackets to porcelain surfaces always remain a challenge to the clinicians. Various modalities have been suggested for improving the bonding of the brackets onto the porcelain surfaces however none have been conclusive. Hence the aim of the study was to compare the bond strength achieved by metal brackets bonded to porcelain fused to metal surface by different surface conditioning methods.
Material & Method: 64 porcelain fused to metal discs were used to assess the shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface conditioning methods: Group I: Silane coupling agent, Group II: Sandblasting (APA- Air Particle Abrasion), Group III: 9.6% Hydrofluoric acid (HFA), Group IV: Fine diamond bur for bonding metal brackets to ceramic surfaces. Metal brackets were bonded to the ceramic substrates with a light cure composite. The samples were stored in 0.9% NaCl solution for 24 hours and then thermocycled (5000 times, 5°C to 55°C, 30 seconds). Shear bond tests were performed with a universal testing machine (Instron).
Result: All shear bond strength (SBS) values in present study were above optimal range except for Group I (Silane coupling agent) and Group III (9.6% hydrofluoric acid), rendering them clinically acceptable.
Conclusion: Diamond bur and sandblasting showed the highest bond strength. Increased damage to the ceramic surfaces was noted with the use of diamond bur and sandblasting. Hence sandblasting (APA) can be clinically used as it gives acceptable results in terms of bond strength and surface roughness, but the health risks should be considered.